Wolf Moon Penumbral Lunar Eclipse and How to See It From Australia

The new year brings some intriguing yet fantastic celestial treats that can’t be missed. We will start this Saturday, in the morning, with a penumbral lunar eclipse. Such a phenomenon occurs due to the solar eclipse in the Middle East and the area of Asia and Australia in December. This one is called the Wolf Moon.

The Moon and Sun are still aligned, and it will result in a penumbral lunar eclipse over some area of the country. Because it’s not a total lunar eclipse, the Moon will appear somewhat odd during the phenomenon. This eclipse starts off the first eclipses of this year, four lunar and two solar.

How Can You Observe the Penumbral Lunar Eclipse From Australia

The luckiest will be some parts of Australia, along with some countries in Asia, Europe, and Africa. Also, most of Western Australia will be able to observe the phenomenon entirely, while the rest of the country will only view parts of the eclipse’s effects. The regions are as follows:

  • New South Wales – Central Coast, Sydney, Wollongong, Port Macquarie, Coffs Harbour, Bourke, Dubbo, Wagga Wagga, Albury, and Newcastle starting at 4:07 am, with the maximum penumbral eclipse varying from 5:52 am to 6:10 am.
  • Victoria – Wodonga, Geelong, Ballarat, Melbourne, Mildura, and Shepparton starting at 4:07 am, with the maximum penumbral eclipse varying from 6:03 am to 6:10 am.
  • Queensland – Sunshine Coast, Brisbane, Gold Coast, Bundaberg, Toowoomba, Rockhampton, Townsville, Mackay, and Cairns starting at 3:07 am, with the maximum penumbral eclipse varying from 4:57 am to 5:10 am.
  • Western Australia – Broome, Perth, and Kalgoorlie starting at 1:07 am, with the maximum penumbral eclipse at 3:10 am.
  • Tasmania – Launceston, and Hobart starting at 4:07 am, with the maximum penumbral eclipse at 5:40 am.
  • Northern Region – Alice Springs, and Darwin starting at 2:37 am, with the maximum penumbral eclipse at 4:40 am.
  • South Australia – Mount Gembler, and Adelaide starting at 3:37 am, with the maximum penumbral eclipse at 5:40 am.

What Is a Wolf Moon Penumbral Eclipse?

The penumbral eclipses, like other lunar eclipses, happen whenever the Earth crosses between the Sun and the Moon. Such a thing results in obscuring the Sun’s light, putting a shadow onto the Moon’s ground. A penumbral eclipse represents a massively subtle event to view.

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